Map

Welcome to the Parachute visual and interactive map profiling injury prevention efforts taking place across the country. We received many requests for this tool and it is our hope that this map will provide an instrumental picture of Parachute’s partner network, and will help groups to build linkages and strengthen networks locally as well as more broadly. The map is a work in progress and we encourage organizations to send us their feedback. Anyone interested in joining the map please contact map@parachutecanada.org.  

This work has been made possible through the generous support of the Ontario Trillium Foundation, an agency of the Government of Ontario, and through the support of the J.W. McConnell Family Foundation. 

To access the map, click the image below:

What is a ThinkFirst Chapter?

ThinkFirst Chapters are made up of the following:

Advisory Board: 

Chapters are run by dedicated volunteers who have a passion for injury prevention. A Chapter Advisory Board is comprised of a group of committed individuals. Ideally, an Advisory Board will have a mix of medical professionals such as neurosurgeons, doctors, and nurses,  and others that touch on injury prevention professionally or personally, such as teachers, social workers, coaches, police officers, and parents. The Advisory Board, usually four to ten members strong, will help set priorities for the Chapter, build relationships within the community, and fundraise. 

Chapter Leads:

Each Chapter must have a Chapter Coordinator and Director who will advocate injury prevention messages, promote educational programs, and work to increase the Chapter's exposure within the community. The Chapter leads are responsible for keeping in touch with Parachute, ensuring available resources are used for injury prevention initiatives, and reporting to Parachute where appropriate. Chapters may also engage other volunteers for specific tasks.  Volunteer responsibilities can include arranging and participating in school and community presentations and fundraising activities.

Our Networks

A key part of Parachute’s work as a force to awaken and move Canadians is to connect with others, and to facilitate links and collaborations with those in injury prevention.  As such, the Parachute partner network is a vital component of our work.

Parachute’s partner network extends from coast to coast to coast and comprises diverse groups, organizations and individuals, including municipal officials, emergency service workers, community organizers and medical professionals. Parachute’s partner network includes groups begun under the four legacy organizations: Safe Kids Canada, SMARTRISK, ThinkFirst Canada and Safe Communities Canada. 

Partners:

Our partner network consists of nearly 3,000 professionals and organizations.  Health care professionals, emergency service officers, educators, daycare providers and many others receive information, resources and support from Parachute to enhance their injury prevention efforts.  

Schools:

Parachute works with high schools across Canada to present  special youth-focused injury campaigns, such as teen driver safety.

We also work in elementary schools presenting our Safe Kids Week, Walk This Way (Pedestrian Safety) and Brain Waves programs.

Public support is integral to the successful implementation of these programs, and the school community, along with Parachute, work with local injury prevention champions, health units, and emergency services to ensure these programs flourish.  To find out more about our school programs and which schools are involved, please contact the Solutions Department at Parachute. 

Chapters:

Parachute’s ThinkFirst Chapters are located across Canada.  They are comprised of individuals who devote their time and energy to prevent head and spinal cord injuries.  Through public awareness initiatives such as school presentations and helmet fittings, volunteers with Parachute’s ThinkFirst Chapters work to let everyone know about the importance of protecting the brain and spinal cord from injury and trauma. 

An Advisory Committee, consisting of medical professionals, educators, coaches, emergency service representatives and parents, guides each Chapter.  These committees help the Chapter Director and Coordinator, as well as other volunteers, build community relations, set priorities and develop strategic plans.  The Chapter Director and Coordinator manage the daily work of the chapter and liaise with Parachute regularly. Read more about what a Chapter is.

Designated Safe Communities:

Sixty-eight communities in Canada have been designated as Safe Communities, with more communities seeking this designation every year.  Linked to an international movement begun in 1989, Canadian Safe Communities believe that a safe life is a basic right.  A designation is a public affirmation of, and testament to, a community’s aspiration to create a safer life for all its citizens.

Communities who have obtained the Safe Community designation have shown considerable commitment to promoting injury prevention and safety promotion locally.  They have brought together local officials from their municipalities at a leadership table, including representatives from local government, public health, police, fire and emergency services, educational institutions, local business, and health and safety organizations.  Designated Safe Communities have completed a formal Priority Setting Exercise and community scan, to inform their programming decisions.

Find out more about designated Canadian Safe Communities:

To find out more about becoming a designated Safe Community, please read the Parachute Safe Communities Program Designation Guidelines.  

Information for designated communities and those seeking designation:

Safe Communities

Designated Safe Communities:

Sixty-eight communities in Canada have been designated as Safe Communities, with more communities seeking this designation every year.  Linked to an international movement begun in 1989, Canadian Safe Communities believe that a safe life is a basic right.  A designation is a public affirmation of, and testament to, a community’s aspiration to create a safer life for all its citizens.

The official designation of a municipality as a Safe Community indicates a publicly articulated commitment to work towards a safer locality for all. It is not an end point, but rather, the beginning of a concerted effort to make injury prevention and safety promotion a top community priority with tangible results, ultimately creating safer places where citizens can live, work and play. Communities that choose to see the designation process through to the end and commit to a collaborative relationship with Parachute, members of the Parachute network and others in the domain of health and safety, are also agreeing to some guiding principles, namely leadership, sustainability, community engagement and prioritization of injury prevention.

Communities who have obtained the Safe Community designation have shown considerable commitment to promoting injury prevention and safety promotion locally.  They have brought together local officials from their municipalities at a leadership table, including representatives from local government, public health, police, fire and emergency services, educational institutions, local business, and health and safety organizations.  Designated Safe Communities have completed a formal Priority Setting Exercise and community scan, to inform their programming decisions, and they have a proven plan for sustainability.

Find out more about designated Canadian Safe Communities:

Designated Safe Communities in Canada
Safe Community Microsites

To find out more about becoming a designated Safe Community, please read the Parachute Safe Communities Program Designation Guidelines.  

Information for designated communities and those seeking designation:

List of designated Safe Communities in Canada

1 Brockville, Leeds and Grenville, ON June 1996

2 Medicine Hat, AB (South Eastern Alberta) October 1996

3 Waterloo, ON October 1996

4 Lakeland, AB December 1996

5 Peterborough, ON December 1996

6 Strathcona County, AB December 1996

7 Kingston, ON June 1997

8 Smith Falls, ON September 1997

9 Sarnia, ON October 1997

10 Rainy River, ON November 1997

11 Belleville, ON June 1998

12 Owen Sound, ON September 1998

13 Orillia, ON November 1998

14 High River, AB November 1998

15 Ajax/Pickering, ON November 1998

16 London, ON April 1999

17 Brantford, ON May 1999

18 Slave Lake, AB June 1999

19 Muskoka, ON September 1999

20 Grande Prairie, AB November 1999

21 Hamilton, ON January 2000

22 Sault Ste. Marie, ON February 2000

23 Cambridge, ON May 2000

24 Chatham-Kent, ON May 2000

25 Thunder Bay, ON December 2000

26 Perth, ON May 2001

27 Timmins, ON November 2001

28  Dufferin County , ON (Hill Country) January 2002

29  Avalon East, NFLD March 2002

30  Fort McMurray/Wood Buffalo, AB June 2002

31  Annapolis Valley, NS (Wolfville) October 2002

32  Brampton, ON January 2003

33  Calgary, AB April 2003

34  Halifax, NS June 2003

35  Red Deer, AB (Central Alberta) September 2003

36  Elliot Lake, ON October 2003

37  St. Thomas-Elgin, ON October 2003

38  South Shore, NS November 2003

39  Ottawa, ON December 2003

40  Brandon, MB June 2004

41  Sudbury, ON June 2004

42  Kamloops, BC August 2004

43  Leduc, AB (International Region) October 2004

44  Richmond, BC November 2004

45  M’Chigeeng First Nation, ON November 2004

46  Dryden, ON November 2004

47  Kenora, ON November 2004

48  Prince Albert, SK May 2005

49  Welland, ON May 2005

50  Whitehorse, YK May 2005

51  Espanola, ON September 2005

52  Humboldt, SK November 2005

53  Bruce County, On September 2006

54  Winnipeg, MB September 2008

55  Cranbrook, BC February 2009

56  Port Colborne, ON March 2009

57  Midland, ON March 2009

58  Kawartha Lakes, ON March 2009

59  Assiniboia, SK May 2010

60  Carman-Dufferin, MB June 2010

61  Squamish, BC April 2011

62  Woodstock, ON February 2012

63  Sherbrooke, QC October 2012

64  Wellington County, ON June 2013

65  Halton Hills, ON January 2015

66  Northumberland County, ON April 2015

67  Windsor, ON June 2016

68 Bruce Peninsula, ON January 2017

69 Southern Bruce County, ON June 2019

Priority Review Exercise

Parachute Safe Communities Program

Priority Review Exercise

If it has been three years since your initial Priority Setting Exercise, your Leadership Table must organize a Priority Review Exercise (PRE).

What is a Priority Review Exercise?

A Priority Review Exercise permits your Safe Community Leadership Table, and other representatives and interested parties, to review the priorities initially set out when your community undertook its Priority Setting Exercise (PSE). Your Leadership Table must organize a meeting where the priorities, and related activities, programs and projects, can be reviewed and assessed. The outcome of your PRE should be a clear picture of what is happening in your community to address your injury prevention priorities. 

The purposes of the PRE are to:

  • Assess whether the priorities established at your PSE are still valid
  • Assess which priorities have been addressed, how and to what effect
  • Determine which priorities have not been addressed, if any, and why
  • Determine which interventions have not been effective, and why

How do we run a PRE?

The following steps will help you organize a successful PRE:

  1. Gather your Leadership Table. The majority of your Leadership Table must attend this event.
  2. Invite other interested parties. Organizations that were represented at your PSE should also be at your PRE. Make particular note to invite representatives of partnering organizations of your Safe Community.  
  3. Assign a facilitator to lead the exercise. This person should clearly lay out the intention for the meeting, your objectives, and the process you’ll move through to achieve these.
  4. Review your original priorities. Take note of what you decided were your community’s top priorities, and assess what has been done to address these since your designation. Consider breaking into groups, where each group looks at one priority and its activities, and reports to the larger group. Or consider each priority and its activities as a larger group.

What do we do with the information?

Once you’ve assessed your original priorities, focus your energy on looking forward. Create a plan for the next two years that will allow your Safe Community to meet its injury prevention objectives. Ask yourselves the following:

  • Are the priorities we set out to address still valid for our community? Should we refocus our efforts?
  • Have we been addressing issues other than those that were originally laid out in the PSE? Does this mean our community really needs a fresh PSE?
  • Have the programs we’ve chosen to address our priorities been evidence-informed?  Can we do some evaluation to judge their effectiveness?

A strong Leadership Table and facilitator will help make your PRE successful. With the information gathered, you will set a path for the future and hold people accountable for their roles in this plan.  

If it has been more than five years since your last Priority Setting Exercise, your Leadership Table is required to lead the community in a new PSE. Please see the Priority Setting Exercise Guide for information about how this activity should be organized and executed.

Safe Communities Re-designation Guidelines

Parachute Safe Communities Program

Re-Designation Guidelines

Parachute requires that all designated Safe Communities renew their designation status every five years. The process is very straightforward. Achieving re-designation is a far simpler process than applying for the original designation.  

To initiate the re-designation process, Safe Community co-chairs are asked to submit a letter stating their intention to seek re-designation, accompanied by a letter of endorsement from the municipal authority.  Please note, the re-designation process should not be initiated until these letters are received by Parachute.

Once confirmation is received from Parachute, Safe Communities should prepare their application for re-designation, which should include the following.  Please submit an electronic package which includes:

  • The letter of intention from the co-chairs expressing their intention to seek re-designation, and the accompanying letter of support fomr a representative of the municipal authority .
  • A membership list of the Safe Community Leadership Table with affiliations listed.  You must show evidence that your Leadership Table is comprised of a variety of community officials, which must include representation from local government, public health, police, fire/EMS and other recommended bodies such as educational institutions, local businesses, NGOs, youth and seniors’ groups, health and safety organizations, recreation groups or appropriate provincial ministries.  
  • The adopted Terms of Reference and any addendum made since designation.
  • The Safe Community’s Succession Plan, revised as necessary.
  • A description of the Priority Setting or Priority Review Exercise and results.
  • Evidence and results of the Community Scan. This survey was originally administered prior to designation, and should be re-administered prior to re-designation. You should specifically explain how you intend to liaise with other community organizations that could enhance and coordinate injury prevention efforts locally.
  • Copies of minutes from the last two meetings of the Leadership Table, which must have taken place within the previous 12 months.
  • A copy of the operating budget for the Safe Community, which accounts for the next three years of operation.
  • Proof of administrative capacity.  
  • A copy of the community action plan, which guides the Safe Community’s activities for the next three years.
  • A formal letter signed by the co-chairs which makes reference to the Safe Community’s commitment to meet at least three times a year and to participate fully in the Parachute partner network.

Parachute will respond to your package with a letter to the local government official, e.g., Mayor, Warden or their designate. Copies will be sent to the co-chairs.