Child Injury Prevention (Ages 0-6)

Additional resources

Throughout the Introduction to Child Injury Prevention e-learning course, a number of resources were referenced.  We have provided these references and links under the headings: Ages and Stages, Healthy Child Development/Resiliency, Social Determinants of Injury, Behaviour Change, Policy Development, and Other Resources.  

Ages and stages 

Injuries often happen when a child reaches a developmental milestone and acquires a new skill.  Therefore, caregivers need to understand the basics of child development and anticipate their child’s next developmental milestone before it happens. This allows them to adjust the environment and their behaviour to decrease the risk of injury.  Listed below are some resources that frame the injury issues in an ages and stages approach.  As well, you will be able to identify the various images that fit with these ages and stages.

Healthy child development / Resiliency

In lesson 2 of the ICIP e-learning course, we highlighted the strong relationship between healthy child development, resiliency and injury.  We also highlighted the role those working in family resource centres or other programs that work with families of young children, can play in enhancing the development of children – in all four areas: cognitive, emotional, social and physical. 

Below are the resources referenced in the course and other resources that address this topic:

Behaviour change

Lesson 4 of the ICIP e-learning course focuses on how to influence behaviour change by understanding your target audience and the benefits and barriers they see to either keeping their current behavior or changing their behaviour to provide a safer environment for their children.   Lesson four follows a 5A’s template –ask, advise, assess, assist, arrange , adapted from a  tobacco cessation approach used by a number of our partners.  East Tennessee State University. Tennessee Intervention for Pregnant Smokers.  

This article summarizes the same concepts but from a social marketing approach:

If you want further training around social marketing please visit CDC Cyndergy .

Social determinants of injury 

As part of this project, we contracted with one of our partners to enhance a workshop they had developed around the social determinants of injury, and to create a facilitator’s guide. 

Starting a discussion with a broad range of people in your community on the Social Determinants of Health/Injury that could be the first step in developing a program or policy change that you have identified.  These materials are a supplement to Lesson 7 on Influencing Public Policy Development.

Policy development

People working in the area of child injury prevention may identify policy development/revision as a critical strategy to use to address a particular issue facing their community.  Lesson 7 of the course guides you through a planning approach that was adapted from the Thought About Food, food security project.  The steps used in that resource (and in Lesson 7) are an adaptation of the 8 Steps to Developing a Health Promotion Policy, linked below.

Other resources

Child Injury Prevention (Ages 0-6)

Program examples and evaluation tools

Program examples for a number of injury issues that affect children 0-6 have been created as additional resources for Lessons 5 and 6 of the Introduction to Child Injury Prevention e-learning course.  These examples are based on best practice and share activities, key messages and strategies that groups have done or could use to integrate into your child injury prevention work.

These examples follow two formats:

  • The Lesson 5 examples follow the more streamlined planning model of A Journey to the Teachings: A Community Approach to Injury Prevention (Source: © All rights reserved. A Journey to the Teachings: A Community Approach to Injury Prevention: Facilitator Manual. Health Canada, 2009.  Reproduced with permission from the Minister of Health, 2014)
  • These examples concentrate on the key messages and strategies that you could use to integrate child injury prevention into your work.
  • The Lesson 6 versions provide a story and an example of what a community group could do to address the issue.  There are links to various resources and programs that you could use in your community.  The Lesson 6 examples follow the planning template of the Canadian Injury Prevention Curriculum, upon which the Introduction to Child Injury Prevention e-learning course is based.  This level of detail is often required for those looking for program funding and who need to evaluate their work. 

Sample pre and post surveys as well as observation questionnaires have also been provided.  These survey tools can be used as is, or adapted to assist in the evaluation of your child injury prevention programs.

Title Program Example (pdf) Program Example (pdf)

Survey and/or 
questionnaire
(Word)

Child passenger restraint  Lesson 5 Lesson 6

Survey

Booster seat questionnaire

Child poisoning prevention Lesson 5 Lesson 6 Survey
Falls prevention Lesson 5 Leson 6 Survey
Scalds - burns from liquids Lesson 5 Lesson 6 Survey
Burns from fire   Lesson 6  
Suffocation related incidents Lesson 5 Lesson 6 Survey
Drowning prevention Lesson 5 Lesson 6

Survey

Lifejacket
observation
 questionnaire

Safe sleep Lesson 5 Lesson 6 Survey
Playground safety   Lesson 6 Survey
Child Injury Prevention (Ages 0-6)

About child injury prevention

Introduction

Injuries remain the leading cause of death for children in Canada and a leading cause of hospitalization.  Families who have a lower income, or live in poor housing conditions are often more at risk for injury.  Everyone has a role to play in keeping children safe.

The resources provided in this section are designed for practitioners working in the Community Action Program for Children and Canada’s Pre-natal Nutrition Program (CAPC/CPNP), as well as Public Health, Childhood Educators, Day Care staff, or any others working with caregivers (we are using the term caregiver to include parents, grandparents, foster parents and anyone else responsible for the care of a child) and children aged 0-6.  These practitioners identified the need for simple messages and images to use with the families they serve, to teach them about preventing injuries in children.  They also identified the need for training in the area of child injury prevention, particularly addressing the social determinants of health and how to influence behavior change.

This project has been a collaboration between the CAPC/CPNP partners, PHAC, as well as members of the Canadian Collaborating Centres for Injury Prevention (CCCIP). Funding for this project was made available through the Public Health Agency of Canada's CAPC/CPNP National Projects Fund. The views expressed herein do not necessarily represent the view of the Public Health Agency of Canada.

Child injury prevention group e-mail list

Are you interested in child injury prevention?  Do you work with families of young children?  Join the CIPG e-mail list where you will receive updates on child injury prevention resources and information, ask questions, share information, resources and programs with other professionals working with families of young children.

Child injury prevention images and messages

The image gallery gives you direct access to simple images and messages on the following specific injury issues that affect children aged 0-6:

  • Falls
  • Burns and Scalds
  • Drowning
  • Poisoning
  • Suffocation-related injuries and Safe sleep
  • Motor vehicle related injuries (Child passenger restraint)
  • Playgrounds (venue)

Under each injury heading are images of the most common ways a young child can be injured, with a short message that describes the danger or risk in a negative image as well as what can be done to prevent that injury, in the positive image.

In addition, for each injury issue listed above, supplementary messages and links to additional resources available through Parachute and our partners are provided.

E-learning course for free

Introduction to Child Injury Prevention (ICIP) is a free e-learning course for practitioners working with caregivers of children aged 0-6, particularly families that may be new to Canada, have lower literacy, or live in rural or remote places in Canada.  It takes between 2-4 hours to complete all the lessons of the course.  You can leave the course at any time and come back into the beginning of the lesson you were working on.  For more information and to sign-in visit http://www.parachutecanada.org/e-learning/item/child-injury-prevention-course.

E-learning course supplementary resources:

Throughout the Introduction to Child Injury Prevention e-learning course, program examples, evaluation tools, and additional resources for a number of injury issues that affect children aged 0-6 are referenced.  We have provided these resources and examples in a centralized location for you to access.

Additional Resources

Throughout the Introduction to Child Injury Prevention e-learning course, a number of resources were referenced.  We have provided these references and links under the headings: Ages and Stages, Healthy Child Development/Resiliency, Social Determinants of Injury, Behaviour Change, Policy Development, and Other Resources.  

Share / Follow us 

  • We’ve provided samples of posts for Twitter and Facebook (Excel)  that can be used in your own social media channels.
  • Please feel free to use and change these as you need, we’ve created a guide (Word) to help you.

Please follow along for updates and information about the course and resources via the hashtag #introcip and @parachutecanada

Contact us if you have any questions or for more information.

Child Injury Prevention (Ages 0-6)

Images - Safe sleep

Introduction and use of images

The images and messages depicted are the most common ways that children 0-6 are injured from sleep related injuries. For each scenario, there is a negative message that shows what could happen (i.e. a baby suffocating in a blanket) for some, a less negative message that shows the potential of a serious injury  (i.e. baby in same room with a smoldering cigarette). These images have a corresponding positive image that shows what can be done in the environment to prevent that injury (ie. a crib free from hazards and a baby sleeping on his back). Some of the images have been focus group tested by caregivers who are new to Canada, young parents, Aboriginal caregivers or those with lower literacy. 

Some caregivers indicated they needed to see the most negative image to get them thinking about the issue, while others only needed to see a less negative message.  Still others only needed to see the positive message to “get the message” about what they could do to prevent this injury to their child.  For some messages, only one, or a combination image is included to depict that situation, depending on what caregivers suggested. 

We know that education alone does not change behavior.   We need to start the discussion from the caregiver’s own needs and situation and help them work through their own solutions to their ultimate goal- keeping their baby/young child safe.  We need to ensure they have access to the equipment and resources, as well as the knowledge, to minimize the risk of injury as their child grows.  These images are just one additional discussion tool in that larger process.

How to use the images?

These images can be useful in starting discussion about what caregivers know about how to prevent injury and to problem-solve around the barriers they encounter in keeping their children safe.  The images can also be integrated into other resources that you create, such as posters, calendars, displays, etc.

Download

  • To download each image, right-click on the small size or large size link and then select save the image OR download the image to a folder on your computer.
  • NOTE: Small size is low resolution. Large size is high resolution. Download time may vary and will depend on your computer, internet connection and speed.
Child Injury Prevention (Ages 0-6)

Safe sleep

Introduction

Why is this issue important? Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) and other sleep related situations are the leading cause of death for infants under six months in Canada and the 3rd leading cause of death for those under 1. 

Primary messages

The images and messages depicted are the most common ways that children 0-6 are injured from sleep related injuries. Visit the Images section for each topic to view and download the images with their corresponding messages.

How to use the images?

These images can be useful in starting discussion about what caregivers know about how to prevent injury and to problem-solve around the barriers they encounter in keeping their children safe.  The images can also be integrated into other resources that you create, such as posters, calendars, displays, etc.

Program examples and evaluation tool

These safe sleep examples are based on the best practice and share activities that groups have done or could undertake.

The following documents are available for download:

Supplementary messages and resources

  • Infants placed on their back to sleep, have a reduced risk of SIDS.
  • Preventing exposure to tobacco smoke, before and after birth, reduces the risk of SIDS.
  • The safest place for an infant to sleep is in a crib, cradle, or basinet that meets current Canadian regulations.
  • Infants who share a room with a parent or caregiver have a lower risk of SIDS.
  • Infants who share a sleeping surface with an adult have a greater risk of SIDS.
  • Breastfeeding provides a protective effect for SIDS.

For additional messaging and information visit the Home safety: Bed time section of the Parachute website 

_____________

Endnotes

Public Health Agency of Canada analysis of 2009 mortality data from Statistics Canada and 2010/11 hospitalization data from the Canadian Institute for Health Information. (This is the most recent data available.)  

Child Injury Prevention (Ages 0-6)

Images - Drowning prevention

Introduction and use of images

The images and messages depicted are the most common ways that children 0-6 are injured from drowning incidents. For each scenario, there is a negative message that shows what could happen (i.e. a toddler face down in the bath) and for some, a less negative message that shows the potential of a serious injury (i.e. a pre-schooler climbing a ladder to go into a pool, no one watching).  These images have a corresponding positive image that shows what can be done in the environment to prevent that injury (i.e. parent and child (with PFD) walking to the pool with the ladder- pool has self-closing, self-locking gate). Some of the images have been focus group tested by caregivers who are new to Canada, young parents, Aboriginal caregivers or those with lower literacy.

Some caregivers indicated they needed to see the most negative image to get them thinking about the issue, while others only needed to see a less negative message.  Still others only needed to see the positive message to “get the message” about what they could do to prevent this injury to their child. For some messages, only one, or a combination image is included to depict that situation, depending on what caregivers suggested. 

We know that education alone does not change behavior.   We need to start the discussion from the caregiver’s own needs and situation and help them work through their own solutions to their ultimate goal- keeping their baby/young child safe.  We need to ensure they have access to the equipment and resources, as well as the knowledge, to minimize the risk of injury as their child grows.  These images are just one additional discussion tool in that larger process. 

How to use the images?

These images can be useful in starting discussion about what caregivers know about how to prevent injury and to problem-solve around the barriers they encounter in keeping their children safe.  The images can also be integrated into other resources that you create, such as posters, calendars, displays, etc.

Download

  • To download each image, right-click on the small size or large size link and then select "save the image" OR "download the image" to a folder on your computer.  
  • NOTE:  Small size is low resolution.  Large size is high resolution.  Download time may vary and will depend on your computer, internet connection and speed.
Child Injury Prevention (Ages 0-6)

Images - Child passenger restraints

Introduction and use of images

The images and messages depicted are the most common ways that children 0-6 are injured from child passenger related incidents.  For each scenario, there is a negative message that shows what could happen (i.e. a toddler loose in back seat being thrown forward in a crash) and for some, a less negative message that shows the potential of a serious injury (i.e. a  4 yr old child in back seat propelled forward with seatbelt digging into waist and side of neck – not in booster seat).  These images have a corresponding positive image that shows what can be done in the environment to prevent that injury (i.e. 4 yr old in high back booster seat, in back seat, with lap belt potion over hips and chest portion correctly positioned on his shoulder). Some of the images have been focus group tested by caregivers who are new to Canada, young parents, Aboriginal caregivers or those with lower literacy.

Some caregivers indicated they needed to see the most negative image to get them thinking about the issue, while others only needed to see a less negative message.  Still others only needed to see the positive message to “get the message” about what they could do to prevent this injury to their child.  or some messages, only one, or a combination image is included to depict that situation, depending on what caregivers suggested. 

We know that education alone does not change behavior.   We need to start the discussion from the caregiver’s own needs and situation and help them work through their own solutions to their ultimate goal- keeping their baby/young child safe.  We need to ensure they have access to the equipment and resources, as well as the knowledge, to minimize the risk of injury as their child grows.  These images are just one additional discussion tool in that larger process. 

How to use the images?

These images can be useful in starting discussion about what caregivers know about how to prevent injury and to problem-solve around the barriers they encounter in keeping their children safe.  The images can also be integrated into other resources that you create, such as posters, calendars, displays, etc.

Download

  • To download each image, right-click on the small size or large size link and then select "save the image" OR "download the image" to a folder on your computer.
  • NOTE:  Small size is low resolution.  Large size is high resolution.  Download time may vary and will depend on your computer, internet connection and speed.

Images on this topic will be available shortly. Please visit again.

Child Injury Prevention (Ages 0-6)

Images - Suffocation related incidents including choking and strangulation

Introduction and use of images

The images and messages depicted are the most common ways that children 0-6 are injured from suffocation related incidents. For each scenario, there is a negative message that shows what could happen (i.e. a baby on stomach with face buried in comforter being somthered) and for some, a less negative message that shows the potential of a serious injury (i.e. a baby crawling on floor picking up a marble and about to put in mouth).  These images have a corresponding positive image that shows what can be done in the environment to prevent that injury (i.e. baby on back on smooth mattress in a crib with no bumper pads or comforter). Some of the images have been focus group tested by caregivers who are new to Canada, young parents, Aboriginal caregivers or those with lower literacy.

Some caregivers indicated they needed to see the most negative image to get them thinking about the issue, while others only needed to see a less negative message.  Still others only needed to see the positive message to “get the message” about what they could do to prevent this injury to their child.  For some messages, only one, or a combination image is included to depict that situation, depending on what caregivers suggested. 

We know that education alone does not change behavior.   We need to start the discussion from the caregiver’s own needs and situation and help them work through their own solutions to their ultimate goal- keeping their baby/young child safe.  We need to ensure they have access to the equipment and resources, as well as the knowledge, to minimize the risk of injury as their child grows.  These images are just one additional discussion tool in that larger process.

How to use the images?

These images can be useful in starting discussion about what caregivers know about how to prevent injury and to problem-solve around the barriers they encounter in keeping their children safe.  The images can also be integrated into other resources that you create, such as posters, calendars, displays, etc.

Download

  • To download each image, right-click on the small size or large size link and then select "save the image" OR "download the image" to a folder on your computer.
  • NOTE:  Small size is low resolution.  Large size is high resolution.  Download time may vary and will depend on your computer, internet connection and speed.
Child Injury Prevention (Ages 0-6)

Images - Playground safety

Introduction and use of images

The images and messages depicted are the most common ways that children 0-6 are injured in playgrounds. For each scenario, there is a negative message that shows what could happen (e.g. a child being strangled with their scarf caught at the top of the slide) and for some, a less negative message that shows the potential of a serious injury (e.g. a child about to press hand down on broken glass sticking out of the sand). These images have a corresponding positive image that shows what can be done in the environment to prevent that injury (e.g. caregiver checking playground surface for hazards before letting child play). Some of the images have been focus group tested by caregivers who are new to Canada, young parents, Aboriginal caregivers or those with lower literacy.

Some caregivers indicated they needed to see the most negative image to get them thinking about the issue, while others only needed to see a less negative message.  Still others only needed to see the positive message to “get the message” about what they could do to prevent this injury to their child. For some messages, only one, or a combination image is included to depict that situation, depending on what caregivers suggested. 

We know that education alone does not change behavior.   We need to start the discussion from the caregiver’s own needs and situation and help them work through their own solutions to their ultimate goal- keeping their baby/young child safe.  We need to ensure they have access to the equipment and resources, as well as the knowledge, to minimize the risk of injury as their child grows.  These images are just one additional discussion tool in that larger process.

How to use the images?

These images can be useful in starting discussion about what caregivers know about how to prevent injury and to problem-solve around the barriers they encounter in keeping their children safe.  The images can also be integrated into other resources that you create, such as posters, calendars, displays, etc.

Download

  • To download each image, right-click on the small size or large size link and then select "save the image" OR "download the image" to a folder on your computer.
  • NOTE:  Small size is low resolution.  Large size is high resolution.  Download time may vary and will depend on your computer, internet connection and speed.
Child Injury Prevention (Ages 0-6)

Images - Child poisoning prevention

Introduction and use of images

The images and messages depicted are the most common ways that children 0-6 are injured from poisoning. For each scenario, there is a negative message that shows what could happen (i.e. a child drinking cleaning product) and for some, a less negative message that shows the potential of a serious injury (i.e. a child finding medicine in parents purse).  These images have a corresponding positive image that shows what can be done in the environment to prevent that injury (i.e. child playing on floor, purse with medicine up high on counter). Some of the images have been focus group tested by caregivers who are new to Canada, young parents, Aboriginal caregivers or those with lower literacy.

Some caregivers indicated they needed to see the most negative image to get them thinking about the issue, while others only needed to see a less negative message.  Still others only needed to see the positive message to “get the message” about what they could do to prevent this injury to their child.  For some messages, only one, or a combination image is included to depict that situation, depending on what caregivers suggested. 

We know that education alone does not change behavior.   We need to start the discussion from the caregiver’s own needs and situation and help them work through their own solutions to their ultimate goal- keeping their baby/young child safe.  We need to ensure they have access to the equipment and resources, as well as the knowledge, to minimize the risk of injury as their child grows.  These images are just one additional discussion tool in that larger process.

How to use the images?

These images can be useful in starting discussion about what caregivers know about how to prevent injury and to problem-solve around the barriers they encounter in keeping their children safe.  The images can also be integrated into other resources that you create, such as posters, calendars, displays, etc.

Download

  • To download each image, right-click on the small size or large size link and then select "save the image" OR "download the image" to a folder on your computer.
  • NOTE:  Small size is low resolution.  Large size is high resolution.  Download time may vary and will depend on your computer, internet connection and speed.
Child Injury Prevention (Ages 0-6)

Images - Burns and scalds prevention

Introduction and use of images

The images and messages depicted are the most common ways that children 0-6 are injured from scalds and burns. For each scenario, there is a negative message that shows what could happen (e.g. a child being scalded by a hot drink) and for some, a less negative message that shows the potential of a serious injury (e.g. a child reaching for a hot drink). These images have a corresponding positive image that shows what can be done in the environment to prevent that injury (e.g. caregiver use a mug with a tight-fitting lid). Some of the images have been focus group tested by caregivers who are new to Canada, young parents, Aboriginal caregivers or those with lower literacy.

Some caregivers indicated they needed to see the most negative image to get them thinking about the issue, while others only needed to see a less negative message.  Still others only needed to see the positive message to “get the message” about what they could do to prevent this injury to their child. For some messages, only one, or a combination image is included to depict that situation, depending on what caregivers suggested.

We know that education alone does not change behavior.   We need to start the discussion from the caregiver’s own needs and situation and help them work through their own solutions to their ultimate goal- keeping their baby/young child safe.  We need to ensure they have access to the equipment and resources, as well as the knowledge, to minimize the risk of injury as their child grows.  These images are just one additional discussion tool in that larger process.

How to use the images?

These images can be useful in starting discussion about what caregivers know about how to prevent injury and to problem-solve around the barriers they encounter in keeping their children safe.  The images can also be integrated into other resources that you create, such as posters, calendars, displays, etc.

Download

  • To download each image, right-click on the small size or large size link and then select "save the image" OR "download the image" to a folder on your computer.
  • NOTE:  Small size is low resolution.  Large size is high resolution.  Download time may vary and will depend on your computer, internet connection and speed.
Child Injury Prevention (Ages 0-6)

Images - Fall prevention

Introduction and use of images

The images and messages depicted are the most common ways that children 0-6 are injured from falls. For each scenario, there is a negative message that shows what could happen (i.e. baby tumbling down stairs) and for some, a less negative message that shows the potential of a serious injury (i.e. a baby in a wheeled walker about to tumble down stairs).  These images have a corresponding positive image that shows what can be done in the environment to prevent that injury (i.e. baby protected by a gate at the top of stairs). Some of the images have been focus group tested by caregivers who are new to Canada, young parents, Aboriginal caregivers or those with lower literacy.

Some caregivers indicated they needed to see the most negative image to get them thinking about the issue, while others only needed to see a less negative message.  Still others only needed to see the positive message to “get the message” about what they could do to prevent this injury to their child. For some messages, only one, or a combination image is included to depict that situation, depending on what caregivers suggested. 

We know that education alone does not change behavior.   We need to start the discussion from the caregiver’s own needs and situation and help them work through their own solutions to their ultimate goal- keeping their baby/young child safe.  We need to ensure they have access to the equipment and resources, as well as the knowledge, to minimize the risk of injury as their child grows.  These images are just one additional discussion tool in that larger process.

How to use the images?

These images can be useful in starting discussion about what caregivers know about how to prevent injury and to problem-solve around the barriers they encounter in keeping their children safe.  The images can also be integrated into other resources that you create, such as posters, calendars, displays, etc.

Download

  • To download each image, right-click on the small size or large size link and then select "save the image" OR "download the image" to a folder on your computer.
  • NOTE:  Small size is low resolution.  Large size is high resolution.  Download time may vary and will depend on your computer, internet connection and speed.
Child Injury Prevention (Ages 0-6)

Playground safety

Introduction

Why is playground safety important? Less than 5 children 0-9 die from playground injuries each year. However, three hundred and twenty nine (329) children age 0-4 and nine hundred and fifty-four (954)children age 5-9 were admitted to hospital as a result of a playground injury (2010/11). Playground injuries are the second leading cause of injury hospital admissions, after falls in general.As stated in Lesson 1, Introduction to Child Injury Prevention, these admissions are just the tip of the iceberg as many of these children are only seen in a emergency room or at a clinic, andare not admitted to hospital.

Playground injuries are preventable.

Primary messages

The images and messages depicted are the most common ways that children 0-6 are injured in playgrounds. Visit the Images section for each topic to view and download the images with their corresponding messages.

How to use the images?

These images can be useful in starting discussion about what caregivers know about how to prevent injury and to problem-solve around the barriers they encounter in keeping their children safe.  The images can also be integrated into other resources that you create, such as posters, calendars, displays, etc.

Program examples and evaluation tool

These playground safety examples are based on best practice and share activities that groups have done or could undertake.

Following documents are available for download :

Supplementary messages and resources

  • Playground surfaces need lots of sand, pea gravel, wood chips or other recommended surfacing to cushion children when they fall.
  • Keep your young child off equipment that is higher than 1.5 meters (5 feet).  Children are more apt to break a bone if they fall from a higher height, particularly if the surface is packed down or not deep enough.
  • Young children need to learn physical skills when playing, and will challenge themselves to learn new skills..    Children 5-9 like to take chances and need to feel they are doing so, in order to gain self-confidence.  Caregivers need to be ready to step in if the child is in danger, but should not “hover".

For additional messaging and information visit the Playground Safety section of the Parachute website.

__________________

Endnotes

Public Health Agency of Canada analysis of 2009 mortality data from Statistics Canada and 2010/11 hospitalization data from the Canadian Institute for Health Information. (This is the most recent data available.)  

Child Injury Prevention (Ages 0-6)

Burns and scalds prevention

Introduction

Keep hot drinks out of your child's reachWhy are burns1  and scalds important? Less than 5 children age 0-4 and less than 5 children age 5-9 died from burns in Canada in 2009. (When the number of deaths is under 5, Statistics Canada cannot report the actual number, to protect privacy.) Three hundred and forty six (346) children aged 0-4 and fifty-nine (59) children aged 5-9 were admitted to hospital as a result of a burn (2010/11). Burns are the third leading cause for hospital admissions from injury for those 0-4. As stated in Lesson 1, Introduction to Child Injury Prevention, these admissions are just the tip of the iceberg as most of these children are only seen in an emergency room or at a clinic, and are not admitted to hospital.

Fire deaths and burns are preventable.

Primary messages

The images and messages depicted are the most common ways that children 0-6 are injured from scalds and burns. Visit the Images section for each topic to view and download the images with their corresponding messages.

How to use the images?

These images can be useful in starting discussion about what caregivers know about how to prevent injury and to problem-solve around the barriers they encounter in keeping their children safe.  The images can also be integrated into other resources that you create, such as posters, calendars, displays, etc.

Program examples and evaluation tool

These burns and scalds examples are based on best practice and share activities that groups have done or could undertake.

The following documents are available for download:

Supplementary messages and resources

  • Young children under the age of five suffer 83% of all scald injuries requiring hospital admission. 
  • Keep your child away from hot liquids.  Spilled tea, coffee, soup and hot tap water are the leading causes of this painful and potentially serious injury.
  • Lower the temperature of your hot water heater (49 degrees Celsius or 120 degrees Fahrenheit).

For additional messaging and information visit the Scalds and Burns section of the Parachute website.

________________

Endnotes

1  The “burns” category includes burns and related injuries from fire, hot substances and hot objects. The data reflect all these causes.

Public Health Agency of Canada analysis of 2009 mortality data from Statistics Canada and 2010/11 hospitalization data from the Canadian Institute for Health Information. (This is the most recent data available.)  

Child Injury Prevention (Ages 0-6)

Child poisoning prevention

Introduction

Why focus on child poisoning? No young child has died from poisoning in recent years. Poisoning, however, is the second leading cause of injury hospital admissions for those aged 0-4 years (688 admissions in 2010/11). As stated in Lesson 1, Introduction to Child Injury Prevention, these admissions are just the tip of the iceberg as most of these children are only seen in the emergency room or at a clinic, and are not admitted to hospital.

Childhood poisoning is preventable.

Primary messages

The images and messages depicted are the most common ways that children 0-6 are injured from poisoning. Visit the Images section for each topic to view and download the images with their corresponding messages.

How to use the images?

These images can be useful in starting discussion about what caregivers know about how to prevent injury and to problem-solve around the barriers they encounter in keeping their children safe.  The images can also be integrated into other resources that you create, such as posters, calendars, displays, etc.

Program examples and evaluation tool

These poisoning examples are based on best practice and share activities that groups have done or could undertake.

The following documents are available for download:

Supplementary messages and resources

  • Medication is the leading cause of poisoning in children.  Even small amounts of adult medication can be fatal to your child.
  • Children’s vitamins look like candy but are harmful if too many are taken. Teach children that any medication is not candy.
  • Other causes of poisoning are household cleaners and personal care products such as mouthwash or nail polish
  • Many children have swallowed poisonous products that were not stored properly or were taken out of their original container.

For additional messaging and information visit the Poison Prevention section of the Parachute website.

Interactive resources

For ideas on how to develop “look alike” poison displays, check out these websites:

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Endnotes

Public Health Agency of Canada analysis of 2009 mortality data from Statistics Canada and 2010/11 hospitalization data from the Canadian Institute for Health Information. (This is the most recent data available.)  

Child Injury Prevention (Ages 0-6)

Suffocation related incidents including choking and strangulation

Introduction

Why is this issue important? Unintentional suffocation, which also includes strangulation and choking on food and other objects, is the leading cause of injury death in Canada for children 0-4. Twenty-six (26) children aged 0-4 died from suffocation/strangulation/choking in 2009, whereas less than 5 children aged 5-9 died. One hundred and fifty-six (156) children aged 0-4 and twenty-seven (27) aged 5-9 were admitted to hospital as a result of suffocation/strangulation/choking (2010/11). As stated in Lesson 1, Introduction to Child Injury Prevention, these admissions arejust the tip of the iceberg as many of these children are only seen in the emergency room or at a clinic, and are not admitted to hospital.

Choking, suffocation and strangulation injuries are preventable.

Primary messages

The images and messages depicted are the most common ways that children 0-6 are injured from suffocation related incidents. Visit the Images section for each topic to view and download the images with their corresponding messages.

How to use the images?

These images can be useful in starting discussion about what caregivers know about how to prevent injury and to problem-solve around the barriers they encounter in keeping their children safe.  The images can also be integrated into other resources that you create, such as posters, calendars, displays, etc.

Program examples and evaluation tool

These suffocation examples are based on best practice and share activities that groups have done or could undertake.

The following documents are available for download:

Supplementary messages and resources

  • Babies explore their environment by putting things they can reach in their mouth.
  • If a toy fits in the mouth, a child can choke on it.  If an object fits through a cardboard toilet paper roll, it can cause a young child to choke.
  • Follow the recommended ages on the labels of toys.
  • Cordless window coverings are the safest option to prevent strangulation.
  • Grate or cut hard and round foods into strips, for your toddler, to prevent choking
  • Children should sit up straight while eating, and eat slowly.

For additional messaging and information visit the Choking and Home safety: Bedtime sections of the Parachute website.

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Endnotes

Public Health Agency of Canada analysis of 2009 mortality data from Statistics Canada and 2010/11 hospitalization data from the Canadian Institute for Health Information. (This is the most recent data available.)  

Child Injury Prevention (Ages 0-6)

Child passenger restraints

Introduction

Why is child passenger safety important?  In 2009 it was the leading cause of injury death for children 5 - 9.  Nineteen (19) children age 0-4 and thirteen (13) age 5-9 died from motor vehicle related crashes in Canada in 2009.  One hundred and forty (140) children age 0-4 and two hundred and thirteen (213) children age 5-9 were admitted to hospital as a result of a motor vehicle crash (2010/11).   As stated in Lesson 1, Introduction to Child Injury Prevention, these admissions are just the tip of the iceberg as many of these children are only seen in the emergency room or at a clinic, and are not admitted to hospital.

Motor vehicle related injuries are preventable.

Primary messsages

The images and messages depicted are the most common ways that children 0-6 are injured from child passenger related incidents.  Visit the Images section for each topic to view and download the images with their corresponding messages. 

How to use the images?

These images can be useful in starting discussion about what caregivers know about how to prevent injury and to problem-solve around the barriers they encounter in keeping their children safe.  The images can also be integrated into other resources that you create, such as posters, calendars, displays, etc.

Program examples and evaluation tool

These child passenger safety examples are based on best practice and share activities that groups have done or could undertake.

The following documents are available for download :

Supplementary messages and resources

  • Knowing a child’s height and weight before purchasing a new car seat is important
  • Infants and toddlers should remain in a rear-facing car seat for as long as possible because it is the most protective design for vulnerable bodies.  Many car seats in Canada rear-face to 40lbs or more.
  • Follow the instructions that come with the car seat and with the vehicle to ensure the car seat is installed and used correctly.

For additional messaging and information visit the car seat section of the Parachute website.

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Endnotes

Public Health Agency of Canada analysis of 2009 mortality data from Statistics Canada and 2010/11 hospitalization data from the Canadian Institute for Health Information. (This is the most recent data available.)  

Child Injury Prevention (Ages 0-6)

Fall prevention

Introduction

Why are falls important? Five children age 0-4 and less than 5 age 5-9 died from falls in Canada in 2009. (When the number of deaths is under 5,Statistics Canada cannot report the actual number, to protect privacy.) Two thousand, five hundred and sixteen (2516) children age 0-4 and two thousand four hundred and two (2402) children age 5-9 were admitted to hospital as a result of a fall (2010/11). It is by far the leading cause for hospital admissions from injury for those 0-9 more than all other injuries combined. As stated in Lesson 1, Introduction to Child Injury Prevention, these admissions are just the tip of the iceberg as most of these children are only seen in the emergency room or at a clinic, and are not admitted to hospital.

Falls are preventable.

Primary messages

The images and messages depicted are the most common ways that children 0-6 are injured from falls. Visit the Images section for each topic to view and download the images with their corresponding messages.

How to use the images?

These images can be useful in starting discussion about what caregivers know about how to prevent injury and to problem-solve around the barriers they encounter in keeping their children safe.  The images can also be integrated into other resources that you create, such as posters, calendars, displays, etc.

Program examples and evaluation tool

These falls examples are based on best practice and share activities that groups have done or could undertake.

The following documents are available for download:

Supplementary messages and resources

  • Falls account for more than half of all the injuries and most often children fall from furniture and stairs, in addition to falling through windows.
  • Babies’ heads are large compared to the rest of their bodies.  This affects their balance and makes them more vulnerable to falls.
  • Keep one hand on your child while they’re on the change table.
  • Babies can climb before they can walk.  Secure furniture and remove table cloths before a child reaches this stage.
  • Toddlers or young child should use socks with treads in the house.  They help prevent slipping.

For additional messaging and information visit the Home Safety section of the Parachute website

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Endnotes

Public Health Agency of Canada analysis of 2009 mortality data from Statistics Canada and 2010/11 hospitalization data from the Canadian Institute for Health Information. (This is the most recent data available.)  

Child Injury Prevention (Ages 0-6)

Drowning prevention

Introduction

Why is drowning important?  Sixteen (16) children age 0-4 and 5 children age 5-9 died from drowning in Canada in 2009. Sixty-nine (69) aged 0-4 and eighteen (18) aged 5-9 experienced near-drowning and were admitted to hospital. It is the third leading cause of death from injury for those 0-4, after choking/suffocation and motor vehicle related incidents.

Drowning is preventable.

Primary messages

The images and messages depicted are the most common ways that children 0-6 are injured from drowning incidents. Visit the Images section for each topic to view and download the images with their corresponding messages. 

How to use the images?

These images can be useful in starting discussion about what caregivers know about how to prevent injury and to problem-solve around the barriers they encounter in keeping their children safe.  The images can also be integrated into other resources that you create, such as posters, calendars, displays, etc.

Program examples and evaluation tool

These drowning examples are based on best practice and share activities that groups have done or could undertake.

The following documents are available for download:

Supplementary messages and resources

  • Use a dog fence, or other fencing to keep your child away from a water filled kiddy/small pool.
  • Don’t rely on older siblings to supervise younger children.
  • Teach children how to swim.
  • Always supervise children in and around any type of water source.
  • Use sunscreen for children over one.  Use a sun shirt on babies or small children.
  • Use a sunshade or beach umbrella.  Make sure you and your child drink plenty of water when out in the sun.

For additional messaging and information visit the Drowning Prevention section of the Parachute website.

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Endnotes

Public Health Agency of Canada analysis of 2009 mortality data from Statistics Canada and 2010/11 hospitalization data from the Canadian Institute for Health Information. (This is the most recent data available.)